Home » Dispersion of the Louisiana Legislature and the General Condition of the Southern States: Speech of Hon. John B. Gordon, of Georgia, in the United States Senate, January 29, 1875 by John B Gordon
Dispersion of the Louisiana Legislature and the General Condition of the Southern States: Speech of Hon. John B. Gordon, of Georgia, in the United States Senate, January 29, 1875 John B Gordon

Dispersion of the Louisiana Legislature and the General Condition of the Southern States: Speech of Hon. John B. Gordon, of Georgia, in the United States Senate, January 29, 1875

John B Gordon

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331177258
Paperback
30 pages
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Excerpt from Dispersion of the Louisiana Legislature and the General Condition of the Southern States: Speech of Hon. John B. Gordon, of Georgia, in the United States Senate, January 29, 1875The Senate having under consideration the resolutionMoreExcerpt from Dispersion of the Louisiana Legislature and the General Condition of the Southern States: Speech of Hon. John B. Gordon, of Georgia, in the United States Senate, January 29, 1875The Senate having under consideration the resolution submitted by Mr. Schurz on the 8th of January, directing the Committee on the Judiciary to inquire what legislation is necessary to secure to the people of the State of Louisiana their rights of self-government under the Constitution -Mr. Gordon said:Mr. President: I am compelled to ask a hearing on this subject once more. In my recent remarks in the Senate I did not denounce, as has been so roundly asserted, either the Government of the United States, or the present Administration or any man connected with it. I made no allusion to President Grant, none to General Sheridan, none to recent events in Louisiana. And although in a representative republic I can conceive of no higher duty of a citizen than to defend the principles of his government and its administration when right, or, on the other hand, to criticise the latter when wrong, yet I abstained from all discussion of these, expressly stating my purpose to do so for reasons given at the time. I rose then simply to correct the erroneous impressions which prevailed here and to repel assaults made upon the southern people, and to express my abiding confidence that the spirit of animosity manifested in this debate was not the spirit of the northern people, soldiers or citizens. This, and only this. Apprehensions, however, expressed at the time, that the utterances of any southern man upon this floor would be misconstrued and misjudged, have been abundantly confirmed.But, sir, no such violent demonstrations as we have witnessed, no such exhibitions of prejudice and of passion, however irritating under other circumstances, should swerve from the discharge of duty nor tempt an American Senator to descend from the height of this great argument, nor silence his confident appeals to reason and to the sense of justice of the American people.What are the questions which we ought legitimately to discuss without passion or prejudice?First. Was the recently dispersed Legislature of Louisiana a lawful body?Second. Independent of the question of its legality or illegality, was the Constitution of the United States by that dispersion broken?Involved in those is a third question, to which I shall give most of my time, namely, the general condition of the Southern States.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.